Neurodiversity is beautiful 1.25” pin back button autism neurodivergence adhd - The Art of Jaymee Laws
Neurodiversity is beautiful 1.25” pin back button autism neurodivergence adhd - The Art of Jaymee Laws
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Neurodiversity is beautiful 1.25” pin back button

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1.25” button Neurodiversity is a concept that’s been around for a while. In a nutshell, it means that brain differences are just that: differences. So conditions like ADHD and autism aren’t “abnormal.” They’re simply variations of the human brain. For those with learning and thinking differences, the idea of neurodiversity has real benefits. It can help kids (and their parents) frame their challenges as differences, rather than as deficits. What is neurodiversity? The current concept of neurodiversity has a basis in science. We know from brain-imaging studies that there are some differences between kids with learning and thinking differences and their peers. Those differences appear in how the brain is “wired” and how it functions to support thinking and learning. These findings can explain the source of difficulty for many kids with learning and thinking differences. But the neurodiversity view is that brain differences are normal. And kids who have them are as mainstream as those who don’t have them. Where neurodiversity began Judy Singer came up with the term neurodiversity in the late 1990s. Singer, a sociologist on the autism spectrum, rejected the idea that people with autism were disabled. Singer believed their brains simply worked differently from other people’s. The term was quickly embraced by activists in the autism community and beyond. Advocates have used it to fight stigma and promote inclusion in schools and in the workplace. The movement emphasizes that the goal shouldn’t be to “cure” people whose brain works differently. The goal is to embrace them as part of the mainstream. And that means providing needed support so they can fully participate as members of the community. Neurodiversity and learning and thinking differences The concept that people are naturally diverse learners is important for kids with learning and thinking differences. It can reduce stigma and the feeling that something is “wrong” with them. And that can help build confidence, self-esteem , motivation , and resilience.